Last edited by Zolorisar
Monday, July 13, 2020 | History

1 edition of Estimating historical snag density in dry forests east of the Cascade Range found in the catalog.

Estimating historical snag density in dry forests east of the Cascade Range

Estimating historical snag density in dry forests east of the Cascade Range

  • 160 Want to read
  • 23 Currently reading

Published by U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station in Portland, OR .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Cascade Range Region.
    • Subjects:
    • Forest ecology -- Cascade Range Region.,
    • Forest plants -- Cascade Range Region.,
    • Snags (Forestry) -- Cascade Range Region.

    • Edition Notes

      StatementRichy J. Harrod ... [et al.].
      SeriesGeneral technical report PNW ;, GTR-428, General technical report PNW ;, 428.
      ContributionsHarrod, Richy J., Pacific Northwest Research Station (Portland, Or.)
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsQK938.F6 E78 1998
      The Physical Object
      Pagination16 p. :
      Number of Pages16
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL485327M
      LC Control Number98214244
      OCLC/WorldCa40108464

      FIRE AND THE FOREST HISTORY OF THE NORTH CASCADE RANGE [Les C Cwynar] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying : Les C Cwynar. § This estimate is for ‘‘trees yrs plus large stumps’’ and likely underestimates the A.D. historical tree density; data are from Perry et al. ( Fig. 2). } These forests are described by Agee as dry mixed conifer, but the abundance of pre-EuroAmerican white fir could suggest.

      Restoration of Dry Forests in Eastern Oregon A FIELD GUIDE July Authors: Dr. Jerry F. Franklina, Dr. K. Norman Johnsonb, Dr. Derek J. Churchillc, Keala Hagmanna, Debora Johnsond, and James Johnstonb aSchool of Environmental and Forest Sciences, College of the Environment, University of Washington, Seattle, WAFile Size: 5MB. Assessment of forest density using geospatial techniques of a tropical protected area M. Shamshad Alam1#*, Jamal A. Khan2, Bharat J. Pathak3$ and Sandeep Kumar4 1&2 Department of Wildlife Sciences, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh, India 3 Gujarat Forest Department, Wildlife Circle, Junagadh, by: 4.

      Fire is an ecologically significant process in the fire-prone ponderosa pine and mixed conifer forests of the northern Sierra Nevada. Fire regimes are influenced by processes that operate over a range of scales that can be grouped broadly as bottom-up (e.g., topography, forest type) or top-down (e.g., climate variation, human land use) by: density forests has been common (e.g., Ful e et al. ). Here we first synthesize published evidence that GLO reconstructions (Table 1) are well validated and accurate for reconstructing historical forests and fire in dry forests of the western United States, then use them in an additional synthesis to analyze variation in historical forest Cited by:


Share this book
You might also like
A first social development policy for Tuvalu.

A first social development policy for Tuvalu.

post of honour

post of honour

Angel, Archangel

Angel, Archangel

Meistererzählungen

Meistererzählungen

Caviare to the general.

Caviare to the general.

series of eight radio talks on Mining, metallurgy, and oil refining

series of eight radio talks on Mining, metallurgy, and oil refining

AK Soaring Scores McAs Math LVL E

AK Soaring Scores McAs Math LVL E

Elements of a fast decimal arithmetic unit

Elements of a fast decimal arithmetic unit

Flame photometry.

Flame photometry.

Concrete roads.

Concrete roads.

Manpower development

Manpower development

Precautions against fire and explosition in underground car parks.

Precautions against fire and explosition in underground car parks.

William Walton

William Walton

Estimating historical snag density in dry forests east of the Cascade Range Download PDF EPUB FB2

If eight representa- tive snag sizes are selected, snag density in historical landscapes ranged from to snags per hectare ( to snags per acre). Keywords: Snag density, ponderosa pine, Pinus ponderosa,snag recruitment, historical forest structure.

Estimating historical snag density in dry forests east of the Cascade Range. Portland, OR: U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station, [] (OCoLC) Material Type: Government publication, National government publication, Internet resource: Document Type: Book, Internet Resource: All Authors.

Get this from a library. Estimating historical snag density in dry forests east of the Cascade Range. [Richy J Harrod; Pacific Northwest Research Station (Portland, Or.);]. Estimating historical snag density in dry forests east of the Cascade Range / By Richy J. Harrod and Or.) Pacific Northwest Research Station (Portland.

Abstract "August "Includes bibliographical references (p. ).Mode of access: Internet. found: Estimating historical snag density in dry forests east of the Cascade Range, found: Glossary of forestry terms / British Columbia Forest Service, via WWW, Sept.

14, (snag: a standing dead tree or part of a dead tree from which at least the smaller branches have fallen). Snag density (S) was calculated by holding forest stand structure relatively constant (basal area range to square meters per hectare [60 to 80 ft2/acre] and diameter size class.

We studied bushy-tailed woodrats (Neotoma cinerea occidentalis) in the eastern Washington Cascade Range to estimate their density and survival in 3 typical dry forest cover types. We predicted woodrat density to be high, moderate, and low in mature mixed-conifer forests, young mixed-conifer forests, and open ponderosa pine forests, by: Snag dynamics in a chronosequence of 26 wildfires on the east slope of the Cascade Range in Washington State, USA.

International Journal of Wildland Fire 9(4) Finn, S. P., D. Varland, and J. Marzluff. Snag dynamics in a chronosequence of 26 wildfires on the east slope of the Cascade Range in Washington State, USA.

International Journal of Wildland Fire 9(4) Everett, R.L., R. Schellhaas, D. Keenum, D. Spurbeck, and P. Ohlson. Fire history in the ponderosa pine/Douglas-fir forests on the east slope of the Washington Cascades.

Standing dead trees (snags) made up a smaller but important component of overstory stand structure. Pre-treatment snag density averaged 38 stems/ha across all units, with unit means ranging from 8 to 63 stems/ha (Fig.

2D). Snag basal area averaged m 2 /ha, with unit means ranging Cited by: Estimating historical snag density in dry forests east of the Cascade Range / (Portland, OR: U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station, []), by Richy J.

Harrod and Or.) Pacific Northwest Research Station (Portland (page images at HathiTrust). Estimating historical snag density in dry forests east of the Cascade Range.

Gen. Techn. Rep. PNW-GTR August Portland, OR: USDA Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station.

16p. Harrod, R. J., D. Peterson, N. Povack, and E. Dodson. Thinning and prescribed fire effects on overstory tree and snag structure in dry. Mechanical thinning and prescribed burning practices are commonly used to address tree stocking, spacing, composition, and canopy and surface fuel conditions in western US mixed conifer forests.

We examined the effects of these fuel treatments alone and combined on snag abundance and spatial pattern across 12 ha treatment units in central Washington by: Forest management effects on snag density have been well documented (Graves et al., ).

Snag density tends to be low in areas of intensive timber harvest and increased human access (Wisdom and Bate, ), while large snags are more abundant in unharvested stands (Marcot et al., ). Snag density also differs by ownership, ecoregion, and Cited by: Only 5 of the 16 nest stands contained snag densities within the range estimated for historical dry forests of the eastern Cascades (– snags ha-1; Harrod et al.

), and only 50% of snags encountered are considered a suitable size for nesting (dbh > cm; 87% of snags used for nesting in this area were > cm dbh).

The largest snags in this study were mostly remnants from previous Cited by: 5. DecAID - USDA Forest Service. Download PDF. 2 downloads 29 Views KB Size Report. Comment. USDA Forest Service, S.W. Main Street, Portland, OR The intent of the model is to update and replace existing snag-wildlife models in Washington and Oregon.

Whereas the relationship of dead and decaying wood to wildlife habitat is a major. ABSTRACT: I compared characteristics of sites of Western Bluebird (Sialia mexi-cana) nests in natural tree cavities in burned and unburned logged ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) forests along the east slope of the Cascade Range of Washington, – and Tree density and percent debris cover (litter and large woody.

Korol et al. ( and unpublished data) derived historical range of variability (HRV) for snag densities in dry forests with a low-intensity fire regime of to snags/ha > 51 cm dbh ( to /acre > 20 in). HRV was determined by subtracting and adding 30% to the average of snags/ha > 51 cm dbh (/acre > 20 in).

We examined fire evidence on 55 fire history sites located in the Cascade Range. To estimate dates of historic fires we analyzed 57 partial cross-sections from fire-scarred trees plus increment cores. The resulting fire events indicate fire has been a widespread component of. For example, the 80% tolerance level for snag density is snags/acre >10 inches dbh in the Eastside Mixed Conifer, East Cascades/Blue Mountains, Mid Successional Structure Class (EMC_ECB_M), the interpretation would be that 80% of the area in EMC_ECB_M would have snag densities of snag.

We studied bushy-tailed woodrats (Neotoma cinerea occidentalis) in the eastern Washington Cascade Range to estimate their density and survival in 3 typical dry forest cover types. We predicted woodrat density to be high, moderate, and low in mature mixed-conifer forests, young mixed-conifer forests, and open ponderosa pine forests, respectively.

We livetrapped on 8 × 8 grids ( m) over an 8 Cited by: Establishing conservation baselines with dynamic distribution models for bat populations facing imminent decline species in Oregon and Washington that included either % forest cover or snag density covariates.

Snag models with in a mix of forest (and snags) and rock habitat, especially east of the Cascade Range where historical Cited by: Appendix C – Response to Comments Oregon Wild Comments Comment 1: Page 2 - Appropriate treatments - It is not clear how shelterwood and sanitation harvest will lead to Intermountain Forest and Range Experiment Station: Estimating historical snag density in dry forests east of the Cascade Range.

Gen. Tech. Rep. PNW-GTR File Size: 1MB.